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Water Wise: Native Plants for Intermountain Landscapes

Large book cover: Water Wise: Native Plants for Intermountain Landscapes

Water Wise: Native Plants for Intermountain Landscapes
by

Publisher: Utah State University Press
ISBN/ASIN: 0874215617
ISBN-13: 9780874215618
Number of pages: 254

Description:
This comprehensive volume provides specific information about shrubs, trees, grasses, forbs, and cacti that are native to most states in the Intermountain West, and that can be used in landscaping to conserve water, reflect and preserve the region's landscape character, and help protect its ecological integrity.

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