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Computational Approaches to the Study of Movement in Archaeology

Large book cover: Computational Approaches to the Study of Movement in Archaeology

Computational Approaches to the Study of Movement in Archaeology
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Publisher: De Gruyter Open Ltd
ISBN/ASIN: 3110288311
Number of pages: 137

Description:
The archaeological study of movement and of its related patterns and features has been transformed by the use of GIS. Path analysis has become a very popular approach to the study of settlement and land-use dynamics in landscape archaeology. This volume addresses theoretical, technical and interpretative issues and presents case studies.

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