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Prolog Programming: A First Course

Prolog Programming: A First Course
by


Number of pages: 197

Description:
The course for which these notes are designed is intended for undergraduate students who have some programming experience and may even have written a few programs in Prolog. They are not assumed to have had any formal course in either propositional or predicate logic. The original function was to provide students studying Artificial Intelligence (AI) with an intensive introduction to Prolog so, inevitably, there is a slight bias towards AI.

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