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Privacy on the Line: The Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption

Large book cover: Privacy on the Line: The Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption

Privacy on the Line: The Politics of Wiretapping and Encryption
by

Publisher: The MIT Press
ISBN-13: 9780262514002
Number of pages: 496

Description:
A penetrating and insightful study of privacy and security in telecommunications for a post-9/11, post-Patriot Act world. Whitfield Diffie and Susan Landau strip away the hype surrounding the policy debate over privacy to examine the national security, law enforcement, commercial, and civil liberties issues.

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