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GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) Internals

GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) Internals

Publisher: Free Software Foundation

Description:
This manual is mainly a reference manual rather than a tutorial. It discusses how to contribute to GCC, the characteristics of the machines supported by GCC as hosts and targets, how GCC relates to the ABIs on such systems, and the characteristics of the languages for which GCC front ends are written. It then describes the GCC source tree structure and build system, some of the interfaces to GCC front ends, and how support for a target system is implemented in GCC.

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