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The Nature of the Physical World

Large book cover: The Nature of the Physical World

The Nature of the Physical World
by

Publisher: The Macmillan Company
ISBN/ASIN: 1417907185
Number of pages: 380

Description:
The course of Gifford Lectures that Eddington delivered in the University of Edinburgh in January to March 1927. It treats of the philosophical outcome of the great changes of scientific thought which have recently come about. The theory of relativity and the quantum theory have led to strange new conceptions of the physical world; the progress of the principles of thermodynamics has wrought more gradual but no less profound change.

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