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Lecture notes on the formation and early evolution of planetary systems

Small book cover: Lecture notes on the formation and early evolution of planetary systems

Lecture notes on the formation and early evolution of planetary systems
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 63

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These notes provide an introduction to the theory of the formation and early evolution of planetary systems. Topics covered include the structure, evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks; the formation of planetesimals, terrestrial and gas giant planets; and orbital evolution due to gas disk migration, planetesimal scattering, and planet-planet interactions.

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