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Shove It, FizzBuzz: How to Find and Land a .NET Development Job

Small book cover: Shove It, FizzBuzz: How to Find and Land a .NET Development Job

Shove It, FizzBuzz: How to Find and Land a .NET Development Job
by

Publisher: shoveitfizzbuzz.com
Number of pages: 236

Description:
This book teaches you the five traits every successful developer should possess, gives tips on how to improve your overall marketability, teaches you how to write an effective resume, and prepares you for a technical interview. It will tell you the tidbits of information that developers usually don't discover until many years into their careers.

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