Logo

Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?

Small book cover: Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?

Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?
by


Number of pages: 413

Description:
The purpose of this book is to help you understand how to program shared-memory parallel machines without risking your sanity. By describing the algorithms and designs that have worked well in the past, we hope to help you avoid at least some of the pitfalls that have beset parallel projects.

Home page url

Download or read it online for free here:
Download link
(4.6MB, PDF)

Download mirrors:
Mirror 1

Similar books

Book cover: An introduction to one-way quantum computing in distributed architecturesAn introduction to one-way quantum computing in distributed architectures
by - arXiv
This review provides a gentle introduction to one-way quantum computing in distributed architectures. One-way quantum computation shows significant promise as a model for distributed systems, particularly probabilistic entangling operations.
(4837 views)
Book cover: Linux Parallel Processing HOWTOLinux Parallel Processing HOWTO
by - The Aggregate
This document discusses the basic approaches to parallel processing available to Linux users: SMP Linux systems, clusters of networked Linux systems, parallel execution using multimedia instructions, and attached processors hosted by a Linux system.
(7302 views)
Book cover: Parallel Computing Works!Parallel Computing Works!
by - Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
A clear illustration of how parallel computers can be successfully applied to large-scale scientific computations. The book demonstrates how various applications in physics, biology and other sciences were implemented on real parallel computers.
(5125 views)
Book cover: Introduction to Distributed SystemsIntroduction to Distributed Systems
by - arXiv
An overview of distributed computing systems. The definition, architecture, characteristics of distributed systems and the various fallacies are discussed. Finally, discusses client/server computing, World Wide Web and types of distributed systems.
(5119 views)