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Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?

Small book cover: Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?

Is Parallel Programming Hard, And, If So, What Can You Do About It?
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Number of pages: 413

Description:
The purpose of this book is to help you understand how to program shared-memory parallel machines without risking your sanity. By describing the algorithms and designs that have worked well in the past, we hope to help you avoid at least some of the pitfalls that have beset parallel projects.

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