Cluster Lenses by Jean-Paul Kneib, Priyamvada Natarajan

Small book cover: Cluster Lenses

Cluster Lenses

Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 120

Clusters of galaxies are the most recently assembled, massive, bound structures in the Universe. As predicted by General Relativity, given their masses, clusters strongly deform space-time in their vicinity. Clusters act as some of the most powerful gravitational lenses in the Universe. Light rays traversing through clusters from distant sources are hence deflected, and the resulting images of these distant objects therefore appear distorted and magnified.

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