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An Inquiry-Based Introduction to Proofs

Small book cover: An Inquiry-Based Introduction to Proofs

An Inquiry-Based Introduction to Proofs
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Publisher: Saint Michael's College
Number of pages: 23

Description:
Introduction to Proofs is a Free undergraduate text. It is inquiry-based, sometimes called the Moore method or the discovery method. The text consists of a sequence of exercises, statements for students to prove, along with a few definitions and remarks. The instructor does not lecture but instead lightly guides as the class works through the material together.

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