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The Geometry of General Relativity

Small book cover: The Geometry of General Relativity

The Geometry of General Relativity
by

Publisher: Oregon State University
Number of pages: 158

Description:
The manuscript emphasizes the use of differential forms, rather than tensors, which are barely mentioned. The focus is on the basic examples, namely the Schwarzschild black hole and the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models. The material should be suitable for both advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in both mathematics and physics.

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