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Computer Science Introduction to Wolfram Mathematica

Small book cover: Computer Science Introduction to Wolfram Mathematica

Computer Science Introduction to Wolfram Mathematica
by

Publisher: Ryerson University
Number of pages: 257

Description:
This book is an introduction to Wolfram and Mathematica written in computer science spirit, using this language not just for mathematics and equation solving but for all sorts of computer science examples and problems from the standard CS101 exercises all the way up to stuff that would be third or fourth year projects (graphs, logic, AI, learning, recursion).

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