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The Human Freedom Index by Ian Vasquez, Tanja Porcnik

Small book cover: The Human Freedom Index

The Human Freedom Index
by

Publisher: Fraser Institute
ISBN-13: 9781939709905
Number of pages: 116

Description:
The Human Freedom Index (HFI) is the most comprehensive measure of freedom ever created for a large number of countries around the globe. It captures the degree to which people are free to enjoy major liberties such as freedom of speech, religion, and association and assembly, as well as measures freedom of movement, women's freedoms, crime and violence, and legal discrimination against same-sex relationships.

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