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After London, or Wild England

Large book cover: After London, or Wild England

After London, or Wild England
by

Publisher: eBooks@Adelaide
ISBN/ASIN: B0016PJG3U
Number of pages: 133

Description:
This is a science fiction novel by Richard Jefferies, an English naturalist and writer. He describes an England of the distant future in which most of the people have either died or they have been removed to some other place. Most of the of the British Isle is now covered by a giant lake, a swamp covers the site of old London. Felix, the hero of the story, sets out on a quest in a canoe to win the hand of the daughter of a neighboring baron.

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