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To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

Small book cover: To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy
by

Publisher: NASA History Division
ISBN/ASIN: 0160485789
ISBN-13: 9780160485787
Number of pages: 301

Description:
Andrew J. Butrica has written a comprehensive and illuminating history of this little-understood but surprisingly significant scientific discipline. Quite rigorous and systematic in its methodology, To See the Unseen explores the development of the radar astronomy specialty in the larger community of scientists.

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