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Simple Justice by Charles Murray

Large book cover: Simple Justice

Simple Justice
by

Publisher: Civitas Book Publisher
ISBN/ASIN: 1903386446
ISBN-13: 9781903386446
Number of pages: 131

Description:
In his essay Simple Justice, the celebrated American sociologist Charles Murray provides an uncompromising restatement and defence of the backward-looking, retributive justification of criminal punishment. He also makes an impassioned plea for England to revert to this approach to dealing with convicted offenders, something, he claims, it did until comparatively recently, when those administering its criminal justice system replaced it with a more complex, non-retributive approach.

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