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Consistent Quantum Theory by Robert B. Griffiths

Large book cover: Consistent Quantum Theory

Consistent Quantum Theory
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN/ASIN: 0521539293
ISBN-13: 9780521539296
Number of pages: 408

Description:
This volume elucidates the consistent quantum theory approach to quantum mechanics at a level accessible to university students in physics, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science, making this an ideal supplement to standard textbooks. Griffiths provides a clear explanation of points not yet adequately treated in traditional texts and which students find confusing, as do their teachers.

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