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Seeing Theory: A visual introduction to probability and statistics

Small book cover: Seeing Theory: A visual introduction to probability and statistics

Seeing Theory: A visual introduction to probability and statistics
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Publisher: Brown University
Number of pages: 66

Description:
The intent of the website and these notes is to provide an intuitive supplement to an introductory level probability and statistics course. The level is also aimed at students who are returning to the subject and would like a concise refresher on the material.

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