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Fluctuation-Dissipation: Response Theory in Statistical Physics

Small book cover: Fluctuation-Dissipation: Response Theory in Statistical Physics

Fluctuation-Dissipation: Response Theory in Statistical Physics
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 148

Description:
General aspects of the Fluctuation-Dissipation Relation (FDR), and Response Theory are considered. After analyzing the conceptual and historical relevance of fluctuations in statistical mechanics, we illustrate the relation between the relaxation of spontaneous fluctuations, and the response to an external perturbation.

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