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Computational Physics by Konstantinos Anagnostopoulos

Small book cover: Computational Physics

Computational Physics
by

Publisher: National Technical University of Athens
Number of pages: 682

Description:
This book is an introduction to the computational methods used in physics, but also in other scientific fields. It is addressed to an audience that has already been exposed to the introductory level of college physics, usually taught during the first two years of an undergraduate program in science and engineering.

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