Logo

Practical Foundations for Programming Languages

Large book cover: Practical Foundations for Programming Languages

Practical Foundations for Programming Languages
by

Publisher: Carnegie Mellon University
Number of pages: 580

Description:
This is a working draft of a book on the foundations of programming languages. The central organizing principle of the book is that programming language features may be seen as manifestations of an underlying type structure that governs its syntax and semantics. The emphasis, therefore, is on the concept of type, which codiļ¬es and organizes the computational universe in much the same way that the concept of set may be seen as an organizing principle for the mathematical universe. The purpose of this book is to explain this remark.

Home page url

Download or read it online for free here:
Download link
(1.2MB, PDF)

Similar books

Book cover: Computational Category TheoryComputational Category Theory
by
The book is a bridge-building exercise between computer programming and category theory. Basic constructions of category theory are expressed as computer programs. It is a first attempt at connecting the abstract mathematics with concrete programs.
(18942 views)
Book cover: Concrete Semantics: With Isabelle/HOLConcrete Semantics: With Isabelle/HOL
by - Springer
The book teaches the reader the art of precise logical reasoning and the practical use of a proof assistant as a tool for formal proofs about computer science artefacts. All the mathematics is formalised in Isabelle and much of it is executable.
(6640 views)
Book cover: Compositional SemanticsCompositional Semantics
by - UMass Amherst
Contents: Basic Categorial Syntax; Shortcomings of Standard Categorial Syntax; Expanded Categorial Syntax; Examples of Expanded Categorial Syntax; Categorial Logic; Basic Categorial Semantics; Lambda-Abstraction; Expanded Categorial Semantics; etc.
(15709 views)
Book cover: Anatomy of Programming LanguagesAnatomy of Programming Languages
by - UT Austin
This document is a series of notes about programming languages, originally written for students of the undergraduate programming languages course at UT. It assumes knowledge of programming, and in particular assume basic knowledge of Haskell.
(8155 views)