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Computational Category Theory

Computational Category Theory
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Number of pages: 263

Description:
This book is an account of a project in which basic constructions of category theory are expressed as computer programs. The programs are written in a functional programming language, called ML, and have been executed on examples. The authors have used these programs to develop algorithms for the unification of terms and to implement a categorical semantics. In general, this book is a bridge-building exercise between category theory and computer programming. These efforts are a first attempt at connecting the abstract mathematics with concrete programs, whereas others have applied categorical ideas to the theory of computation.

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