How Open Is the Future? by Marleen Wynants, Jan Cornelis

Large book cover: How Open Is the Future?

How Open Is the Future?

Publisher: ASP-VUB Press
ISBN/ASIN: 9054873787
ISBN-13: 9789054873785
Number of pages: 534

With the rise of the internet and the growing concern over intellectual property, this study provides an open, constructive platform for a wide range of lawyers, artists, journalists, and activists to discuss their views on the future of free and open-source software. By exchanging both complementary and conflicting opinions, the contributors look ahead to the evolution, prospects, and issues of sharing knowledge and ideas through technology.

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