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Probability Theory: The Logic of Science

Large book cover: Probability Theory: The Logic of Science

Probability Theory: The Logic of Science
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN/ASIN: 0521592712
Number of pages: 758

Description:
The book is addressed to readers who are already familiar with applied mathematics at the advanced undergraduate level or preferably higher. The text is concerned with probability theory and all of its conventional mathematics, but now viewed in a wider context than that of the standard textbooks.

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