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The National Interest and the Law of the Sea

Large book cover: The National Interest and the Law of the Sea

The National Interest and the Law of the Sea
by

Publisher: Council on Foreign Relations Press
ISBN/ASIN: 0876094310
ISBN-13: 9780876094310
Number of pages: 82

Description:
Written by a leading expert on ocean governance, this report offers a fresh appraisal of the 1982 Convention on the Law of the Sea and pitfalls in light of the current geopolitical seascape and examines whether it is in U.S. strategic interests to now officially join the convention.

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