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Approaching Zero by Paul Mungo, Bryan Glough

Large book cover: Approaching Zero

Approaching Zero
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Publisher: ManyBooks
ISBN/ASIN: 0679409386
Number of pages: 235

Description:
This study offers a somewhat European angle on the 'technological counterculture'. The authors draw on interviews and technical literature to examine the techniques of American and British phreakers, and describe the biggest international gathering of hackers, which took place in Amsterdam in 1989.

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