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A Course of Pure Geometry: Properties of the Conic Sections

Large book cover: A Course of Pure Geometry: Properties of the Conic Sections

A Course of Pure Geometry: Properties of the Conic Sections
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN/ASIN: 111234893X
Number of pages: 314

Description:
The book does not assume any previous knowledge of the Conic Sections, which are here treated ab initio, on the basis of the definition of them as the curves of projection of a circle. Many of the properties of the Conic Sections which can only be established with great labour from their focus and directrix property are proved quite simply when the curves are derived directly from the circle.

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