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Write Yourself a Scheme in 48 Hours

Small book cover: Write Yourself a Scheme in 48 Hours

Write Yourself a Scheme in 48 Hours
by

Publisher: Wikibooks
Number of pages: 138

Description:
You'll start off with command-line arguments and parsing, and progress to writing a fully-functional Scheme interpreter that implements a good-sized subset of R5RS Scheme. Along the way, you'll learn Haskell's I/O, mutable state, dynamic typing, error handling, and parsing features. By the time you finish, you should be fairly fluent in both Haskell and Scheme.

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