Introduction to Sociology

Small book cover: Introduction to Sociology

Introduction to Sociology

Publisher: OpenStax College
Number of pages: 238

Introduction to Sociology was written by teams of sociology professors and writers and peer-reviewed by college instructors nationwide. This free online text meets standard scope and sequence requirements and incorporates current events such as the Occupy Wall Street movement. The text is designed for the Introduction to Sociology course at any two- to four-year school.

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