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Phase Transitions and Collective Phenomena

Small book cover: Phase Transitions and Collective Phenomena

Phase Transitions and Collective Phenomena
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Publisher: University of Cambridge
Number of pages: 119

Description:
Contents -- Preface; Chapter 1: Critical Phenomena; Chapter 2: Ginzburg-Landau Theory; Chapter 3: Scaling Theory; Chapter 4: Renormalisation Group; Chapter 5: Topological Phase Transitions; Chapter 6: Functional Methods in Quantum Mechanics.

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