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Reversible Markov Chains and Random Walks on Graphs

Reversible Markov Chains and Random Walks on Graphs
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Publisher: University of California, Berkeley
Number of pages: 516

Description:
From the table of contents: General Markov Chains; Reversible Markov Chains; Hitting and Convergence Time, and Flow Rate, Parameters for Reversible Markov Chains; Special Graphs and Trees; Cover Times; Symmetric Graphs and Chains; Advanced L2 Techniques for Bounding Mixing Times; Some Graph Theory and Randomized Algorithms; Continuous State, Infinite State and Random Environment; Interacting Particles on Finite Graphs; Markov Chain Monte Carlo.

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