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Gravitational Waves, Sources, and Detectors

Small book cover: Gravitational Waves, Sources, and Detectors

Gravitational Waves, Sources, and Detectors
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 82

Description:
Notes of lectures for graduate students that were given at Lake Como in 1999, covering the theory of linearized gravitational waves, their sources, and the prospects at the time for detecting gravitational waves. The lectures remain of interest for pedagogical reasons, and in particular because they contain a treatment of current-quadrupole gravitational radiation that is not readily available in other sources.

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