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Introduction to Non-Baryonic Dark Matter

Small book cover: Introduction to Non-Baryonic Dark Matter

Introduction to Non-Baryonic Dark Matter
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Publisher: arXiv
Number of pages: 51

Description:
These lectures on non-baryonic dark matter matter are divided into two parts. In the first part, I discuss the need for non-baryonic dark matter in light of recent results in cosmology, and I present some of the most popular candidates for non-baryonic dark matter. These include neutrinos, axions, neutralinos, WIMPZILLAs, etc. In the second part, I overview several observational techniques that can be employed to search for WIMPs (weakly interacting massive particles) as non-baryonic dark matter.

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