Logo

Category Theory and Functional Programming

Small book cover: Category Theory and Functional Programming

Category Theory and Functional Programming
by

Publisher: University of St. Andrews
Number of pages: 99

Description:
This text is intended to provide an introduction to Category Theory that ties into Haskell and functional programming as a source of examples and applications. Topics covered: The definition of categories, special objects and morphisms, functors, natural transformation, (co-)limits and special cases of these, adjunctions, freeness and presentations as categorical constructs, monads and Kleisli arrows, recursion with categorical constructs.

Home page url

Download or read it online for free here:
Read online
(online html)

Similar books

Book cover: Higher Topos TheoryHigher Topos Theory
by - Princeton University Press
Jacob Lurie presents the foundations of higher category theory, using the language of weak Kan complexes, and shows how existing theorems in algebraic topology can be reformulated and generalized in the theory's new language.
(6550 views)
Book cover: A Gentle Introduction to Category Theory: the calculational approachA Gentle Introduction to Category Theory: the calculational approach
by - University of Twente
These notes present the important notions from category theory. The intention is to provide a fairly good skill in manipulating with those concepts formally. This text introduces category theory in the calculational style of the proofs.
(12786 views)
Book cover: An Introduction to Category Theory in Four Easy MovementsAn Introduction to Category Theory in Four Easy Movements
by - Manchester University
Notes for a course offered as part of the MSc. in Mathematical Logic. From the table of contents: Development and exercises; Functors and natural transformations; Limits and colimits, a universal solution; Cartesian closed categories.
(6801 views)
Book cover: Dynamical Systems and SheavesDynamical Systems and Sheaves
by - arXiv
A categorical framework for modeling and analyzing systems in a broad sense is proposed. These systems should be thought of as 'machines' with inputs and outputs, carrying some sort of signal that occurs through some notion of time.
(1032 views)