Logo

A Problem Course in Mathematical Logic

Small book cover: A Problem Course in Mathematical Logic

A Problem Course in Mathematical Logic
by


Number of pages: 166

Description:
A Problem Course in Mathematical Logic is intended to serve as the text for an introduction to mathematical logic for undergraduates with some mathematical sophistication. It supplies definitions, statements of results, and problems, along with some explanations, examples, and hints. The idea is for the students, individually or in groups, to learn the material by solving the problems and proving the results for themselves. The book should do as the text for a course taught using the modified Moore-method.

Home page url

Download or read it online for free here:
Download link
(0.7MB, PDF)

Similar books

Book cover: Symbolic Logic: A Second CourseSymbolic Logic: A Second Course
by - UMass Amherst
Contents: Summary; Translations in Function Logic; Derivations in Function Logic; Translations in Identity Logic; Extra Material on Identity Logic; Derivations in Identity Logic; Translations in Description Logic; Derivations in Description Logic.
(7868 views)
Book cover: A Friendly Introduction to Mathematical LogicA Friendly Introduction to Mathematical Logic
by - Milne Library Publishing
In this book, readers with no previous study in the field are introduced to the basics of model theory, proof theory, and computability theory. The text is designed to be used either in an upper division undergraduate classroom, or for self study.
(2856 views)
Book cover: Intuitionistic LogicIntuitionistic Logic
by - Universiteit van Amsterdam
In this course we give an introduction to intuitionistic logic. We concentrate on the propositional calculus mostly, make some minor excursions to the predicate calculus and to the use of intuitionistic logic in intuitionistic formal systems.
(6801 views)
Book cover: Logic For EveryoneLogic For Everyone
by
This is Robert Herrmann's elementary book in mathematical logic that includes all basic material in the predicate and propositional calculus presented in a unique manner. Neither proof requires specialized mathematical procedures.
(11233 views)