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An Introduction to Gaussian Geometry

Small book cover: An Introduction to Gaussian Geometry

An Introduction to Gaussian Geometry
by

Publisher: Lund University
Number of pages: 75

Description:
The purpose of these notes is to introduce the beautiful theory of Gaussian geometry i.e. the theory of curves and surfaces in three dimensional Euclidean space. The text is written for students with a good understanding of linear algebra, real analysis of several variables, and basic knowledge of the classical theory of ordinary differential equations and some topology.

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